Transforming rural livelihoods and landscapes: sustainable improvements to incomes, food security and the environment.

By 2050...

  • There will be over 9 billion people on the planet.
  • We will need to produce 60% more food.
  • Over 60% of the population will be living in cities.
  • Nearly 40% of the population will be under 18.


But...

  • 40% of the population will still be working in agriculture.
  • Smallholders and family farms will produce over 70% of world food.
  • Over 1 billion people will still be at risk of malnutrition and hunger.

airca-white-paper


AIRCA's Vision and Mission

Vision:

Healthy landscapes for improved livelihoods and food security.

Mission:

Putting research into use by strengthening capacities for sustainable improvements to incomes, food and nutrition security in healthy landscapes.


Landscape challenges

  • Multiple & complex interactions (soil, water, crops, animals, humans, biodiversity, ecology).
  • Agriculture vs Ecosystem services.
  • Farm vs Non-Farm Occupations.
  • Cross-Border issues.
  • Government priorities and cooperation.
  • Need to make trade-offs and capture synergies.
  • Lack of good metrics.


The Broader Context

  • Need for integrated landscape planning to support both development and conservation.
  • Recognize complex system interactions and trans-boundary issues.
  • Preserve or restore ecosystem services.
  • Protect biodiversity and combat invasive species.
  • Develop new agriculture practices to adapt to climate change.
  • Improve land use planning to adapt to climate impacts.


Why AIRCA?

  • Need for integrated action to deliver sustainable agricultural intensification at the landscape scale has stimulated the formation of the Association of International Research and Development Centers for Agriculture (AIRCA).
  • AIRCA is a nine-member alliance focused on increasing food security by supporting smallholder agriculture and rural enterprise within healthy, sustainable and climate-smart landscapes.
  • AIRCA members are:
    • AVRDC - The World Vegetable Center (Shanhua, Taiwan)
    • CABI - CAB International (Wallingford, England, United Kingdom)
    • CATIE - Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center (Cartago, Costa Rica)
    • CFF - Crops For the Future (Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia)
    • ICBA - International Center for Biosaline Agriculture (Dubai, United Arab Emirates)
    • ICIMOD - International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (Kathmandu, Nepal)
    • icipe - African Insect Science for Food and Health (Nairobi, Kenya)
    • IFDC - International Fertilizer Development Center (Muscle Shoals, Alabama, USA)
    • INBAR - International Network for Bamboo and Rattan (Beijing - China)
  • Supported by more than 60 member countries comprising over 70% of the world's population, AIRCA members have activities in all major geographic regions and ecosystem types.
  • All have a proven track record of research, development and implementation, working closely with farmers, extension systems, national research institutes, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and the private sector across a wide range of crops and ecosystems.


What can AIRCA contribute?

  • Experience of varied and challenging ecosystems (geography, climate and politics).
  • Expertise in a wide range of crops.
  • Focus on diverse crops of high economic, nutritional or cultural value.
  • Development of metrics (economics and biology).
  • Innovative mechanisms for communication, knowledge transfer and capacity building.
  • Creative strategies to assess outcomes and impact.


AIRCA members have

  • Expertise across range of ecosystems and substantive crop diversity.
  • Core competencies in health of humans, plants, animals and landscapes.
  • Integrated and holistic approaches to solving development problems at scale.
  • Ability to respond rapidly and efficiently in the face of new problems.
  • Long-established track record of working with member-country.


farmland


AIRCA's recommendations

Food and nutrition security
  • Indigenous crops and animals are often best suited to the region.
  • New crops and varieties can improve climate resilience or resistance to pests and diseases.
  • Crop/diet diversity essential for nutritional security.
  • Understand culture and tradition around food, not just the calories.


nutrition

Improving livelihoods
  • Link farmers to markets, support with information.
  • Improve access to alternative value chains and markets.
  • Help farmers organise, brand and market their crop.
  • Develop agro-forestry systems (fruit, coffee, bamboo).
  • Improve plant health systems and promote IPM approaches.
  • Consider non-farm and off-farm alternatives.


Improving livelihoods

Leveraging the power of mobile
  • Weather
  • Alerts, early warning
  • Market prices, locations
  • Best practice advice
  • Crop health, pests and disease
  • Input supplies
  • Animal health and husbandry
  • Crop Calendar-based advice
  • Finance, credit and insurance
  • Nutrition
  • Health


mobile-use

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